What you Need to Know about Toe and Metatarsal fractures

Toe and Metatarsal fractures are some of the most common fractures that we see in the foot and ankle.  Many of them can be treated without surgery if they are recognized early and treatment is initiated quickly.

Toe fractures often occur from running into a piece of furniture when you are barefoot.  These often seem to happen at night when people are walking around the house.  If a toe fracture is minimally displaced and closed (no break in the skin), the are often treated by budding taping the toes together and wearing a stiff soled postoperative shoe for several weeks.  Although the bones will take 6-8 weeks to heal, often patients can start to transition back to regular shoes in 3-4 weeks.  Most of the time, ice and over the counter anti-inflammatories are sufficient to manage the pain and swelling associated with the injury.

Metatarsal fractures can occur after an inversion ankle injury, where we typically see a Jones fracture of the 5th metatarsal occur.  They also occur with either a fall from a height or direct trauma to that part of the foot.  We see a fair amount of metatarsal stress fractures arise from overuse type injuries, and often these are associated with running or hiking when patients aren't wearing supportive shoes with orthotics or arch supports.

Some metatarsal fractures can be treated with immobilization either in a cast boot or immobilization in a fiberglass cast.  When the fracture displaces significantly, they are typically treated with surgical stabilization of the fracture with either an intramedullary screw or plate fixation.

If you think you may have broken a bone in your foot and ankle, call us right away.  We will work with you to give you your best treatment options to get you back on your feet and active again as soon as possible.  Dr. Hinderland and Dr. Cameron work to treat you with the latest techniques in a compassionate manner.  Call us at 719-488-4664 if there is any way we can help you!

Author
Dr. Matthew Hinderland Board Certified Podiatrist and Foot and Ankle Surgeon

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Our office will be closed on 3/14/24 for the anticipated large impact winter storm that is approaching.  We will still be available by phone at 719-488-4664 during business hours to help you.